Posting Hiatus

Readers, friends, and family, as I continue to fall woefully behind in my attempts to post relevant and interesting content on the blog, I am forced to admit I need to take a hiatus.

I am neck deep into writing my dissertation and an article with very clear deadlines (oh, and I’m going to be a dad!), so I have decided they need my attention more than anything. My hope is that by November I might return to posting on a regular basis. Until then, send good vibes and prayers my way. I need them!

Teacher Mentoring: What We Can Learn from Each Other

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Glenn and I giving the ol’ selfie side-eye.

Meet Glenn. Glenn is my wonderfully enthusiastic, bearded protege and mentee. While I certainly try to mentor as many teachers who are willing to listen to my wild ideas and peculiar practices, Glenn is official. This year marks the first year that my school is positioning veteran teachers (in this case teachers who have been at the school for over a year) alongside newcomers (teachers new to the school, not necessarily new to teaching). I worked closely with a colleague over the summer to build our buddy program. We developed the program to be a support for our newcomers, but also to be a boon for our school. Research, that I should be citing, I know, continues to show supporting the professional growth of teachers continuously and with intention helps with teacher retention and student success rates. Still, beyond both the support this program might provide for new teachers to our school and the quality of instruction in our building, this program gives each of these teachers a voice. Like Glenn. I fully expect Glenn to speak just as loudly into my practice and life as an educator as I hope to speak into his. To get to what I mean, let me first tell you a little bit about Glenn. Continue reading

A Summer Update: Data Analysis, SREB, and a New School Year

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Posting this summer has become an elusive task for me. As much as I meant to chronicle my summer of analyzing data, I have not been inspired to do so. Partially, I have been surprised how far behind I feel in my effort. I suppose I am not really, but there is a bit of mental game being played when spending hours reading transcripts, watching videos, and coding it all. I have a long way to go, but what is emerging from the data is both affirming and surprising. That is the fun part. Yes, tiring to be sure, but also fun. It is like I am on a treasure hunt–a long, at times boring, yet exhilarating treasure hunt.  Continue reading

A Worthwhile Read: A Georgia Tech Student Reflects on #PBL and Internships

“[J]obs that teach you what you DON’T want to do are just as valuable as those that teach you what you DO want to do, just like classes that teach you what you DON’T want to study in college are just as valuable as those that DO. And this is perhaps the most important thing to remember.”

I really want to encourage anyone who sees this post to please share it. I have had the pleasure of knowing Ms. Sibilia since she was a freshman in high school and to watch her evolution from my PBL classroom to her current status as a junior at Georgia Tech has been one of the more rewarding aspects of my career. She has been kind enough to share her reflections in the past on my blog, but this post may best sum up the benefits and purpose of PBL longitudinally. I hope you enjoy reading what’s inside as much as I did. Continue reading