Student Voices: Intern Edition “WBL is What You Make of It”

Student Voices

by Andy C.

“I’ve been yearning for the experiences and professional growth I’m getting everyday at [GCPS TV].”

When you think of the term intern, what immediately pops into your head? To me, I think of someone running around the office tending to the needs of senior staffers, getting their coffee, copying meeting agendas and performing the lowest of tasks in the office. For me and my experiences, that could not be farther from the truth. I work for Gwinnett County Public Schools’ EMMY award-winning educational access TV station, GCPS TV, producing long-form programming and timely Focus Moment news stories as well as assisting in live and live-to-tape in-studio and on-location productions. For as long as I can remember, I’ve been yearning for the experiences and professional growth I’m getting everyday at the station. As I begin to reflect on my past year at GCPS TV, I realize how grateful I am to be apart of such an amazing team of industry professionals. Continue reading

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Next Month: Teacher & Student Voice Series

I’m excited to announce (after a month long hiatus) two series that will be posted in tandem next month:

 

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While I will write a post as part the the ‘Eye Heart Teaching‘ series, most of the posts will be completed by guest writers–both students and teachers.

The ‘Student Voices: Intern Edition‘ series will include entries from my current internship students who are wrapping up their year as industry interns. They’ll reflect on their experiences, the benefits of interning, and may even critique the methods of the internship course itself.

The ‘Eye Heart Teaching‘ series will include entries from colleagues who will share everything from their recent research to evolving teaching and professional philosophies to sharing narratives about their favorite moments in their classrooms in 2017-18.

The first posts will be up by the first week of May. Stay tuned and be sure to share using the hashtag #EyeHeartTeaching and #StudentVoices

Revisiting Banksy (Again): Leveraging Visual Literacy & Documentary to Promote Critical Thinking

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As part of working on a publication that comes out later this year, I worked closely with my colleague and friend, Glenn Chance, in his classroom where he trusted me to help him implement work with visual literacy and connecting it to the work he was doing with memoir. Since I currently do not have my own ELA classroom, I truly appreciate Glenn allowing me to invade his planning and class time. There were several goals of this project and unit, but in today’s post I am only going to concentrate on how we developed visual literacy skills for students and how we partnered them with both memoir, author’s purpose, and documentary. Inside the post there is a breakdown of what we did and or reflections on those actions from our planning and class time in hopes what is shared can help you in your classroom or at the very least continue the conversation for the value of the explicit instruction of visual literacy. For anyone attending GCTE this year, we’ll be presenting this information there as well. Continue reading

The Studio Reunion 2.0: Revisiting the Impact of an Immersive PBL Classroom

Happy New Year!

With a new year comes a renewed focus on the blog, beginning with a very special first post of the year. Nearly two years ago I sat down with four students who were part of my very first cohort of students who were in my completely immersive cross-curricular, project-based learning  classroom. Today I share with you a another conversation made up of five other former students who were part of the second cohort of students. Much like the group before, they are in their final years of college, and they are all on the cusp of entering the job market. Continue reading

Remembering My Own Advice: Student Growth Takes Time, Patience, and Care

I have spent some time on this blog this fall lamenting about the state of some of the employability skills of my intern students. At the end of this past week, I received an email that put my concerns in perspective and reminded me that change and growth are directly tied to time. There are times we all find ourselves ignoring our own best advice and understandings of the human nature. I speak often and candidly to teachers early in their careers about how it may take a semester, a year, or years to see the caring work we put into a student to pay off or to show dividends. While it took a long and at times arduous semester, this small part of the email response below reminded me why I believe what I do about students, and why I give the advice I do to other teachers:

“I promise I will! You’ve been so helpful through me having my first job and giving me advice. This program has given me a real look into real life working and I appreciate it!”

To provide some context, this is in response to a final plea from me via email to follow through on a series of assignments and paperwork required for the course. Essentially, this student had been ignoring much of the work and my outreach for nearly two months.

Now certainly, the student’s words speak to the ego I think all teachers have, but what I admire most–or want to believe the most– is how the student speaks to how the program has given the student “a real look into real life working.” That, my friends, is what it is all about.