Reflection on NCTE 2018

Attending this year’s National Council for Teachers of English (NCTE) national conference was special for many reasons. For one, I missed last year’s conference, giving up my spot for another English teacher to attend from my school at the time. But certainly for another, reconnecting with scholars across the field, old friends, and, sure, that award did not hurt either. For this year’s reflection, I will share a few of the conference’s highlights for me. Continue reading

New Publication–Literacy Engagement through Peritextual Analysis–Out Now!

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Thanks to my former professor, Dr. Jennifer Dail, and one of the book’s editors, Dr. Shelbie Witte, I had the opportunity to contribute a chapter in the recently published Literacy Engagement through Peritextual Analysis (2018, ALA and NCTE). In the fall of 2017, I worked alongside Glenn Rhoades to bring visual literacy and peritextual analysis to his classroom. Peritext constitutes what makes up the components outside of the text proper (i.e. preface, afterwards, index, glossary, dust jackets, etc.). We spent nearly a month helping students learn about visual literacy and peritext as it might relate to pictures and film. In the case of our chapter, Inviting Students to Exit through the Gift Shop: Reading Banksy’s Public Art through Documentary Film and Director’s Cuts, we specifically had student create their own mini-documentaries featuring their own digital, Banksy-inspired pieces.

From the ALA website: “Paying attention to subtext is a crucial component of literacy. However, the concept of peritextual analysis takes such examination much further, teaching readers how to evaluate information and sources using elements that precede or follow the body of the text. A work’s Preface, Afterword, index, dust jacket, promotional blurbs, and bibliography are only some of the elements that can be used to help readers connect with and understand the main text. Speaking directly to librarians and educators working with K-16 students, this important book outlines the Peritextual Literacy Framework and explains its unique utility as a teaching and thinking tool…”

The book and the chapter I co-authored is available now through American Library Association (ALA) and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) and will be featured in the NCTE conference bookstore this week in Houston, TX. See the linked title of the book above to navigate to the ALA store.

See You @ NCAC, NCTE,and ACTE!

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I’ll start by apologizing for yet another long hiatus on the blog. Work in my office has been busy, but engaging and continually interesting. I intend to post on my new adventures as an instructional coach in the world of Career and Technical Education (CTE) soon, including describing some of literacy efforts and how my office reviews instruction and experiences in our college and career readiness academy schools.

In the meantime, November will be a busy, busy month where I will find myself in Texas three times for three different conferences!

ncaclogo2018First up is the National Career Academies Coalition (NCAC) in Houston. I’ve attended before and look forward to attending this year, especially as my focus on academy schools has broadened in my new role.

cropped-NCTE_FaviconNext is the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) in Houston as well. I will receive my Teacher of Excellence Award in person. Still feeling very honored to be awarded and recognized!

VISION-2018_1170x300Finally, I’ll be at the Association of Career and Technical Education (ACTE) in San Antonio. This will be my first time attending, but we have a few of my district’s teachers presenting, so I look forward to supporting them and seeing CTE on an even larger, national scale!

Hope to see a few of you at one of these as well. Remember to follow me on Twitter @theprofjones

A Pleasant Surprise: 2018 NCTE High School Teacher of Excellence

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We all know that Mondays can be the toughest day of the week. When you start a new job, a Monday comes with new, previously unknown challenges. That said, yesterday was not a daunting day, but I did come home rather tired. I got a nice boost of energy when a surprise email popped into my mailbox at 4:09PM. Here’s a snapshot:

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I honestly, truly was not expecting to see this, but I am over the moon. I was selected as one of the fourteen educators to be recognized by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) as a 2018 Teacher of Excellence. NCTE is an organization that I respect, love, and admire. I deeply appreciate the Georgia Council of Teachers of English (GCTE) nominating me for the national recognition after winning their Teacher of the Year award this past February.

Forgive me for indulging in posting this on the blog, but as one might imagine, I’m pretty stinking excited. Thank you to the many, many, many friends, family, and colleagues who are very much a part of this recognition. This simply does not happen without you!

NCTE 2016: A Quick Look Back

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I only got to stay one day this year, but I must say I think Atlanta did a fantastic job hosting this year’s conference! Bravo, ATL!

I’m also digging NCTE’s new logo, or maybe it was just the logo for the conference this year. In any case, love the simplicity of the design.

With the one day I did spend at the conference, I packed in as much as I could, including seeing some fellow doc students and recent grads, meeting with my dissertation chair, hanging out with the Kennesaw State crew, and probably most importantly receiving stellar feedback on my dissertation at my roundtable. The only regret was not getting to meet one of my ELA heroes, Buffy Hamilton, when I had the chance. The stars simply did not align. Continue reading