Teacher Innovation #3: “SCRUM It Up with Kanban with a Side of Trello”

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Post number 3 comes from another colleague and friend, Keith Phillips. Keith is part of my school’s CTE (Career & Technology Education) department and has run and developed our Audio/Visual & Film program for the last four years. Keith is one of my favorite teachers to collaborate with on various projects. He is basically fearless when it comes to trying out new tech and pedagogical approaches in his classroom. He’s a sponge for learning and when he catches fire for something in his classroom, the results are incredible for the kids. His post today introduces SCRUM, a project management protocol found within the Agile model of project design, which fortune 500 companies and various universities use. Keith uses SCRUM to run his many on-going projects and prepare his students for the project methodology they’ll likely see in their careers (A/V careers or otherwise). Finally, Keith dives into how he is transitioning to SCRUM online for his students using a program called Trello.

Previous Teacher Innovation Entries: Part 1 // Part 2

by Keith Phillips

 

If you came into the start of my class this past year you may have heard me say, “SCRUM it up!” and wonder why I was using a rugby term in my classroom.  For those that have never heard of SCRUM, it is an Agile framework for completing complex projects.  When working with SCRUM, the project leader or Scrum Master leads his group members            through a standing meeting.  In the SCRUM each member must answer three questions; What did I do yesterday?, What am I doing today?, and        Did I have any roadblocks?.  The Scrum Master keeps everyone on task and anything that isn’t relevant to the three questions gets placed into the “Parking Lot” for discussion at a later time.  This helps all group members to stay on task and limits the length of the meeting. Continue reading

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Reflecting on My Recent Professional Development Effort: The Power of Teacher Vertical and Cross-Curricular Collaboration

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All professional fields incorporate professional development (PD) into the structure of their occupations. There are always ideas to share and experiences to be had with the intent of growing employees or to simply improve one’s self. The unfortunate reality–at least in education–is a great deal of professional development can feel inadequate at best and a waste of time at worst. It is with this understanding of my own PD experiences that I went into planning a professional development of teachers in my cluster of schools with trepidation. To be transparent, I was nervous I would let my colleagues down and planning a PD experience that lacked the right substance and the right balance of experiential learning and collaboration with some dreaded sit-and-get as well. This was not my first rodeo–I had developed and delivered PD for others before, but rarely do I feel I hit the mark or pushed a narrative forward. Well, this time, this PD, felt different. I walked away after three days of rigorous work with my colleagues believing we had all experienced a PD worthy of our time, energy and effort. Continue reading