Teacher Innovation #6: Using Zines to Promote Black History & Identity Work in the ELA Classroom

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Post #6 is close to my heart and comes from friend and colleague, Glenn Chance. Glenn is a second year ELA teacher at my school. And while technically Glenn is new to teaching, he came to the classroom with plenty of life experience. Glenn has guest posted before. On his first post, I explained his background as a high school dropout, longtime retail worker, and eventual scholar. The reason this post is close to my heart, as the title suggests, is Glenn writes about his use of zines and purposeful identity work in his classroom. Glenn is a relatively fearless, early-years teacher. We talked almost every day this past school year, and I enjoyed watching his tremendous growth. As you will see from his post, Glenn understands how important genuinely combining literature, writing, and identity work really is. I highly recommend reading this post all the way through–especially, if you are considering doing zine work in your own classroom.

Previous Series Entries: Part 1 // Part 2 // Part 3 // Part 4 // Part 5

by Glenn Chance

Introduction – What is a Zine?

Check out these links to learn more – Zines in Action
http://grrrlzines.net/agogo.htm
https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/blog-posts/john-depasquale/zine-making-101/

A zine is a way of saying magazine, just shortened to the last four letters.  Zines are magazines, only miniaturized.  They aren’t new, and have actually been around for decades.  If you’ve ever belonged to a fandom, chances are, there is a zine about it somewhere, or at least there was at one time.   Continue reading

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Zines, Black History, & Lived Experiences

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While many of the upcoming posts will chronicle Ms. S and Ms. C’s adventure into project-based learning, I am also working alongside my colleague Mr. Chance, who has written a post here before, as he uses zines as tool enrich his students’ experience with Black literature and connecting that literature to their own lives. Continue reading

Zine Booth @ Sugar Hill Maker Fest Reflection

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Saturday was a beautiful day. It was also quite windy. While I had to find some creative ways to keep zines from flying off my booth’s table, the experience of being out among the community with my students zines made for an excellent afternoon of conversation and possibly some really positive impact in the community.  Continue reading

Student-Made Zines @ Sugar Hill Maker Fest!

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As wrap up my school year, my data collection, and this years adventure in zine making, my students and I will be showing off their work THIS SATURDAY at the very first Sugar Hill Maker Fest. The maker movement is gaining momentum across the country, and I excited to see both my school and community embrace showing off all the great stuff people make for fun, out of love, and to innovate. I firmly believe my students are makers–they made zines after all–so to celebrate their work we will have a zine booth at the Maker Fest on Saturday. Come by and get a free copy of some of the zines and meet some of their creators!

To me this is one of ultimate opportunities for my students to have a real, authentic audience for their work. The zinecast is great, but sometimes nothing beats the physical distribution of your work. Hope see you there!

Did You Miss the Zinecast? Check It Out Here!

If you missed today’s live zinecast but would like to check it out, the archived video is embedded below. Quick apology–as the students describe their zines, I thought I was screen sharing, but I forgot to click the second button, so you don’t see the zines until the very end–so my apologies. Still, the students’ description of their work is great and there are some really interesting topics covered and conversations had. Enjoy!